Can Sleeping More Help You Lose Weight?

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Our metabolism is something we always want to function better and better (so we don’t put on those hateful extra pounds). It can be stimulated into premium performance in many ways – and one of them is regulating your sleeping habits.

As we consider such issues like dieting, getting slimmer and more muscular, we can’t get around the notion of metabolism (even if we are not quite sure what the word means!). Good metabolism is actually what people who have solid muscle mass and don’t have to struggle to keep in their weight are blessed with. But what it is exactly, and how come all people can’t get the same kind of metabolism?

If you get round to clearing up the situation with your own metabolism, regard the daily amount of calories that you get burned. It doesn’t depend so much on your gym commitment, much as it might sound strange; according to information from Men’s Health, workouts comprise only about 10% of our metabolic processes. The 70-% bulk is ruled by what is known as BMR – the basal metabolic rate which is what actually answers for the movements of your body, and the final 20% is made up from walking, moving about, fidgeting.

Most people are apt to believe that their metabolism is an inborn attribute that cannot be altered. Some can even refuse to diet being sure that it won’t do them any good for their metabolism is poor. But this attitude is all wrong; you can play around with your metabolism changing it to function better.

How can you do it? Your best bet is protein. It helps build up muscle and kicks up metabolism. Do you know that you need thrice the energy needed to burn carbohydrates and fat for burning protein? So it means a lot of work for BMR.

Then, eating little is not a good idea for putting your metabolism on its fast legs. If you take little food, your body will react by storing energy resources, thereby slowing metabolic processes down significantly.

Another important factor is that you should have a good rest. You do your workouts regularly and follow a balanced diet, yet there are no tangible results: consider if you get enough sleep. If you sleep less than eight hours you may not be getting sufficient rest.

Of course, all these reasonings are not meant to make you tear up your life completely and reinvent it. You will certainly ensure brisker metabolism if you intake more protein and start to sleep longer hours, but such measures shouldn’t be taken to extreme lengths. Like to the exclusion of carbs and fats from the diet – your body needs them. Also, it wouldn’t be a good thing if you dropped your job in order to be able to sleep long. Your metabolism may increase to your satisfaction, but in the long run, you need your life to be well-balanced.