Hair & Job Efficience Linked

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Recent research shows that your hair can do with all the attention it can get, professionwise. If you grudge some time in the morning for your hair because you’re in a bustle to get to work on time, think again.

Woman's hairdo

Some Australian boffins assure us that as many as 73% lay great stock by the state of their colleagues’ hair when they evaluate their work performance.

The research, conducted by Australian salon Bossy Hair, also revealed that those women who tie their hair on the back were found to be more proficient at their work generally than women who let their hair hang down.

Therefore, as you tend to your children, get together your things and gulp down the morning coffee – probably trying to do everything at the same time – make a point of allotting a few minutes to your hair to get it in order for the office. Even more so since the research shows that more than a half of men and almost two-thirds of women say their performance depends greatly on their overall appearance, the better they are groomed the more efficient they feel.

As a side bit of information, red hair is regarded as the least welcome in the office – although there is the example of their own PM Julia Gillard to belie this!

Anna Musson, an etiquette specialist, confirms that those who are serious about their career ought to take pains to turn up invariably well-groomed. Your top managers may see you only for a short time at the meetings, she reminds, and their impression of yourself may rely too heavily on your general appearance.

People are apt to go on an assumption that if a person takes care of the way they look, they are highly likely to do their work with just as much care. Grooming goes hand in hand with discipline, and discipline is what is expected at the workplace. Such people exude reliability and ability, and employers feel they have made a good choice in hiring and promoting those who look efficient.