How Much Exercise Helps You Live Longer?

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Even if you’re getting on in years and feeling a bit worn out, the main thing is giving your body lots of movement. Maintaining regular exercise will help you ensure the health of the body and mind alike. That doesn’t mean you have to spend hours on end working out to reap the benefits.

What makes exercising essential

In many a way exercises make your life longer and body stronger for the following reasons:

  • your muscles, bones, and joints retain healthy vigor
  • your blood pressure stays within normal limits
  • it keeps your mood steadier and helps cope with stresses
  • ease symptoms of anxiety and depression
  • it also helps endure periods of frustration and anxiety
  • risk of cardiac diseases decreases
  • diabetes, arthritis or other chronic conditions develop slower or not at all

How much exercise time would be just fine

To go by a study in The Lancet published several years ago, even comparatively low activity (like 15 active minutes per day and around 90 minutes per week) adds 3 years to the life expectancy of those leading sedentary lives. Other health benefits include a diminished risk (by as much as 14%) of dying from cancer or cardiac troubles or other common causes in comparison with those who avoid activity. See for yourself what you can get from 15-minute walk per day!

Even from less exercising time benefit can be derived, as emerges from a study that appeared in PLOS Medicine: about 10 minutes of exercise per day (about 75 minutes of walking or workouts per week) can up life expectancy by almost 2 years, and if you work exercise time to 300 minutes, it will be by 3.4 years, while 500 minutes per week can promise 4 additional years and more.

It may be yet more beneficial for women

Arguably one of the greatest benefits derived from healthy exercising, for women and men alike, is a more radiant mood. Women live 4 years longer than men (once it used to be a wider gap). Actually it’s difficult to pinpoint factors that are essential for lengthening life expectancy, and there is no definite proof that workouts work better for men than for women. Nevertheless walking and other moderate ways of exercising help keep type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular ailments at bay with women more than with men.

Life may be made longer by dint of exercising

When it comes to exercising, anything is worth your while, and every little extra bit of physical activity comes in handy, no matter what gender you belong to. But if we want more vigor, you have to choose a special workout program. If aimed at longevity, one study advises you go for sports like swimming, tennis, racquetball, and aerobics.

The nine-year-long study reveals that of the people who devoted 150 minutes weekly to moderate or strenuous sports those who wielded racquets decreased their risk of dying by 47% compared to sedentary citizens. Vanderbilt University School of Medicine specialists recommend, apart from walking and swimming, strength exercises and Tai chi as wonderful health options.

But all this reasoning often boils down tot he sport that you are keen on. If you mean to do it regularly, you are supposed to like doing it, after all is said!