Tips for Women Who Want a Career in Software Development

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Arguably the job that displays poor equality between man and woman would be that of a software developer. While it remains a male-crowded sphere where no more than 15% of women are engaged, in conjunction with a worrisome number of females who walk out the job because they don’t feel up to competing with dominating males. But is it a valid reason to give up? Things are bound to change, and those who hold on can become role models for others aspiring for the job.

There are good reasons for you to stick your neck out and court hardships: the developers are experiencing about 13% employment growth, and their average salary in the US comes up to $133,000. Yes, the tech has pros!

But you may need a bit of advice to smooth your way into this field.

  1. Of course, the place to start is self-confidence, which we might be lacking, and confidence to inspire as well. This will enable you to state clearly what you expect, what you want, what you mean to attain. Being direct and stringent verbally will win you a rightful place in this biased community.
  2. A more important one than even confidence is perseverance. Don’t succumb to the temptation of comparing your abilities to other people. Remind yourself that you are able to accomplish a project as well as all those geniuses around you.
  3. Find a prospective employer and learn about him as much as you can: whether the company is male-oriented or open for women from the start, whether it offers flexible working hours and not grounds for severe, obviously masculine, competition. If you live, say, in San Fran, type in “tech jobs available in San Francisco” and conduct a thorough survey of every company you may want to get into your sights.
  4. Ask for equal salary. After you have done your homework, you can be aware of your possible value in the chosen company, so don’t let them underrate yourself from the beginning.
  5. Next, bear in mind that as you start working you can feel bad – as if you were some kind of impostor or got the job by fraudulent means. It is only to be expected that sometimes you will be overwhelmed by these feelings, even if you are as skillful and as efficient as the next guy. Be ready for them and think how to cope with them.
  6. At some point you can struck a problem or get a project that you don’t know how to set about. There is nothing abnormal about it – it only means that you need to learn more. Get books, guidelines, any related documentation, peruse all of these carefully, several times if necessary. Remember that nobody knows everything, therefore, you are not entitled to; but try to augment your knowledge with every opportunity. Attend meetups, get to know your colleagues, write or call them and ask for advice.
  7. Get assigned to the most difficult projects. Easy stuff won’t be getting you anywhere much, but if you struggle your way through complicated work it will gain you invaluable experience, respect and brilliant entries in your CV.
  8. Truth to tell, your chosen vocation is not the easiest one. Besides the issues mentioned above, there may be tensions in the family due to your demanding job, frustration due to a task that defies your attempts at solving, and other worries besieging you. As you face up to a problem, say to yourself: this will pass. You will overcome all your hardships and arrive on the other side richer for the experience.

Should you go through all this and come out victorious, you will feel that you have become “automatically memorable” – a situation that gives an enormous boost to your career and your sense of self-confidence. Celebrate your achievement!

So, there are excellent reasons to become a noticed professional, raise awareness, and prepare for equal footing for both men and women in tech.